Written by Papago Pool Service

Why Is My Pool Still Green After Shocking?

Why Is My Pool Still Green After Shocking?

Why Is My Pool Still Green After Shocking

If you are searching for “why is my pool green“, “cloudy pool water“, “I shocked my pool why is it green“, or “green pool water“, this post should help!

These are some of the most common questions we get from our customers.

My pool has been shocked, why is it still cloudy?

My pool has been shocked, why is it still green?

Did I use enough shock? How much shock should I add to the pool?

If I don’t use bleach will my pool become green?

Is my pool being filtered enough? How long should I use the pump for?

Chemical composition of a clear water pool

In order for a pool to look clear and not cloudy, there will be several factors that need to be checked.

pH level – pH levels range between 0 (most acidic) and 14  (most basic) with 7 being neutral. Pool experts recommend a pH of 7.2 and 7.8 for everyday usage.

Proper alkalinity – Alkalinity is different than your pH level and measures the water’s ability to resist change in pH levels making it easier for pH and chlorine ranges easier to stabilize.

Chlorine levels – If chlorine levels are left unchecked algae can overtake the pool water making it cloudy.

Calcium Hardness – A high calcium level will make it harder to dissolve the calcium in the water entirely and may possibly clog your pool filter.

My pool has been shocked why is it still cloudy?

Shock can be a great resource to clean up a pool with dirty water, but it is recommended to wait 18 hours before evaluating the clarity of the pool. If the pool water is still cloudy after 24 hours consider adding a pool clarifier and using your pool filter to remove remaining settlements.

If the pool water is still cloudy after waiting 24 hours and adding a clarifier it is best to evaluate the pool filter and make sure it does not need to replaced or that the filtration system needs maintenance.

My pool has been shocked why is it still green?

When pool chemicals are not properly maintained it is easy for pH levels to get out of whack quickly leading to a green pool. If you have already shocked your pool and taken pH level samples you may still need to add stabilizers or phosphate removers.

A stabilizer also is known as cyanuric acid can increase chlorine levels over time until chlorine is unable to kill off algae.

Phosphates cause algae to grow in your pool and can be brought to the water through organic particles like leaves or bugs. Since the phosphate is basically fueling the growth of algae, a phosphate remover needs to be used in order to cut off the food supply and stop algae from growing.

Did I use enough shock? How much shock should I add to the pool?

When a pool is “shocked” essentially what happens is that liquid or tablets of chlorine are added to make the pool water “super-chlorinated”. For most common residential pools 10 gallons of liquid chlorine or 5 pounds of granular chlorine to shock the pool properly. This choice can be determined by the type of filter system your pool uses since the liquid chlorine is better for sand or cartridge filters, but granular is best for a diatomaceous earth filter.

If I don’t use bleach will my pool become green?

Another common question we hear from our customers is if chlorine is required to keep my water from turning green. Simply answered YES YOU NEED CHLORINE! the reason for this is because a sanitizing agent needs to be used to kill algae as well as bacteria.

Is my pool being filtered enough? How long should I use the pump for?

A pool filter should run continuously for 24 hours after a shock treatment has been added to help remove the cloudiness. If everything works properly and the cloudiness of the pool is reduced so the water is now clear, this is when you would determine how long to run a filter. The length will be determined by outside temperate and the turnover rate of the pool pump.

Since algae grow faster during warmer temperatures a pump will need to run longer during summer months and shorter during winter months when the algae grow slower. Regardless of the season pool water should still be filtered even if it is not being used.

The turnover rate is a measurement of how long it takes for the circulation system to move all of the water in the pool through filter equipment. These can be affected by the size of the pool as well as the gallons per minute rating of your pool pump.

Papago Pool Service Offers Pool Service In Scottsdale, Arizona

Learn more about pool service in Scottsdale or get a free pool cleaning quote by giving us a call today at (480) 423-9333 or filling out our contact form. We also offer saltwater pool service.

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